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International Conference on Wound Care, Tissue Repair and Regenerative Medicine, will be organized around the theme “Advanced technologies in wound care and tissue repair ”

Wound Care Congress 2019 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Wound Care Congress 2019

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

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 In modern-day 21st century, medicine has evolved to involve past treatments such as leech therapy, as well as advancing wound prevention and the treatment. A large part of wound care is wound treatment. This involves promoting healing, preventing infections, and getting rid of an already existent infection. Deciding on a treatment depends on the type of wound that a person has sustained. Varying from infections to burns, wound care is a priority in saving the limb, extremity, or life of a person. In a hospital or medical care setting, more severe wounds like diabetic ulcers, decubitus ulcers, and burns require sterile or clean (depending on the severity of the wound) dressings and wound care. The types of wound dressing include: dry dressings, wet-to-dry dressings, chemical-impregnated dressings, foam dressings, alginate dressings, hydro fiber dressings, transparent film dressings, hydrogel dressings, and hydrocolloid dressings. All of the listed dressing types require different materials to complete the dressing.

 

  • Track 1-1Alginate dressings
  • Track 1-2Dry dressings
  • Track 1-3Foam dressings
  • Track 1-4Chemical-impregnated dressings
  • Track 1-5Wet-to-dry dressings
  • Track 1-6Self-adaptive dressings
  • Track 1-7Hydrocolloid dressings
  • Track 1-8Hydrogel dressings
  • Track 1-9Transparent film dressings
  • Track 1-10Hydro-fiber dressings
  • Track 1-11Wound Signs and Symptoms

\r\n The skin is a barrier to the outside world protecting the body from infection, radiation, and extremes of temperature. There are many types of wounds that can damage the skin including abrasions, lacerations, rupture injuries, punctures, and penetrating wounds. Many wounds are superficial requiring local first aid including cleansing and dressing. Some wounds are deeper and need medical attention to prevent infection and loss of function, due to damage to underlying structures like bone, muscle, tendon, arteries and nerves. The purpose of medical care for wounds is to prevent complications and preserve function. While important, cosmetic results are not the primary consideration for wound repair.

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  • Track 2-1Wounds (Care) Topic Guide
  • Track 2-2Materials
  • Track 2-3Types of cells
  • Track 2-4Wound Overview
  • Track 2-5Wound Causes and Types
  • Track 2-6Wound Signs and Symptoms
  • Track 2-7When to Seek Medical Care for a Wound
  • Track 2-8Wound Care Diagnosis
  • Track 2-9Wound Treatment
  • Track 2-10Wound Prognosis
  • Track 2-11Wound Prevention
  • Track 2-12Synthesis

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\r\n Tissue engineering is the use of a combination of cells, engineering and materials methods, and suitable biochemical and physicochemical factors to improve or replace biological tissues. Tissue engineering involves the use of a tissue scaffold for the formation of new viable tissue for a medical purpose. While it was once categorized as a sub-field of biomaterials, having grown in scope and importance it can be considered as a field in its own.

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  • Track 3-1Scaffolds
  • Track 3-2Extraction
  • Track 3-3Tissue engineered vascular graft
  • Track 3-4Tissue engineered heart valve
  • Track 3-5Nanofiber self assembly
  • Track 3-6Textile technologies
  • Track 3-7Solvent casting and particulate leaching
  • Track 3-8Laser-assisted bioprinting

\r\n The cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning tissue repair and its failure to heal are still poorly understood, and current therapies are limited. Poor wound healing after trauma, surgery, acute illness, or chronic disease conditions affects millions of people worldwide each year and is the consequence of poorly regulated elements of the healthy tissue repair response, including inflammation, angiogenesis, matrix deposition, and cell recruitment. Failure of one or several of these cellular processes is generally linked to an underlying clinical condition, such as vascular disease, diabetes, or aging, which are all frequently associated with healing pathologies. The search for clinical strategies that might improve the body’s natural repair mechanisms will need to be based on a thorough understanding of the basic biology of repair and regeneration.

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  • Track 4-1The Vascular Response: Hemostasis and Coagulation
  • Track 4-2The Cellular Response: Inflammation
  • Track 4-3Proliferation and Repair
  • Track 4-4Neovascularization/Angiogenesis
  • Track 4-5Granulation Tissue Formation
  • Track 4-6Fetal wound healing

In wound healing, as in other areas of medicine, technologies that have the potential to regenerate as opposed to repair tissue are gaining ground. These include customizable nanofiber matrices incorporating novel materials; a variety of autologous and allogeneic cell types at various stages of differentiation (e.g., pluripotent, terminally differentiated); peptides; proteins; small molecules; RNA inhibitors; and gene therapies.

 

  • Track 5-1Scaffolds in tissue engineering
  • Track 5-2Biomaterials
  • Track 5-33D printing
  • Track 5-4Plastic surgery
  • Track 5-5Reconstructive surgery
  • Track 5-6Flap surgery
  • Track 5-7Tissue engineering
  • Track 5-8Tissue transplants
  • Track 5-9Ethics involving tissue transplant

 Cutaneous wound healing has long been a magnet for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine due, in part, to the accessibility of skin, its flat structure and relatively avascular composition, and the fundamentally regenerative nature of healing. Cell therapies are already used for wounds, and good limb salvage options are lacking, rendering wound healing an attractive option for regenerative strategies. The field has witnessed pioneering efforts in tissue-engineered, cell-based, gene-based, and growth factor therapies. As per earlier definitions, to date, none of the commercially available products can truly be considered regenerative as none leads to the regeneration of adnexal structures of the skin such as hair follicles and sweat glands. Nevertheless, some of the tissue-engineered/regenerative medicine technologies have made valuable contributions to the field as demonstrated by significantly improved healing rates over standard of care in randomized trials. Thus, the field is evolving toward regenerative medicine even as most of the current tissue-engineered/regenerative medicine technologies are more in line with Yannas' characterization of partial regeneration.

 

  • Track 6-1Burns and scars
  • Track 6-2Burns and schleroderma
  • Track 6-3Peripheral arterial disease and diabetic foot ulcers
  • Track 6-4Diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers
  • Track 6-5Diabetic foot ulcers and venous leg ulcers
  • Track 6-6Epidermolysis bullosa
  • Track 6-7Venous ulcers

\r\n A commonly applied definition of tissue engineering, is "an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve [Biological tissue] function or a whole organ". Tissue engineering has also been defined as "understanding the principles of tissue growth, and applying this to produce functional replacement tissue for clinical use".A further description goes on to say that an "underlying supposition of tissue engineering is that the employment of natural biology of the system will allow for greater success in developing therapeutic strategies aimed at the replacement, repair, maintenance, or enhancement of tissue function".

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  • Track 7-1Tissue Culture & Preservation
  • Track 7-2Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine
  • Track 7-3Regenerative Rehabilitation
  • Track 7-4Organ & Tissue Regeneration
  • Track 7-5cell & Gene Therapy
  • Track 7-6Stem Cell Transplantation
  • Track 7-7Biomimetic Nano fibers
  • Track 7-8Soft Tissue Implants and dermal Tissue Engineering
  • Track 7-9Tissue Regeneration using Nanotechnology
  • Track 7-10Tissue Repair and Regeneration
  • Track 7-11Tissue Engineering
  • Track 7-12Genetics & Genetic Engineering

A commonly applied definition of tissue engineering, as stated by Langer and Vacanti, is "an interdisciplinary field that applies the principles of engineering and life sciences toward the development of biological substitutes that restore, maintain, or improve [Biological tissue] function or a whole organ". Tissue engineering has also been defined as "understanding the principles of tissue growth, and applying this to produce functional replacement tissue for clinical use". A further description goes on to say that an "underlying supposition of tissue engineering is that the employment of natural biology of the system will allow for greater success in developing therapeutic strategies aimed at the replacement, repair, maintenance, or enhancement of tissue function".

 

  • Track 8-1Bioartificial windpipe: The first procedure of regenerative medicine of an implantation of a
  • Track 8-2In vitro meat: Edible artificial animal muscle tissue cultured in vitro.
  • Track 8-3Bioartificial liver device: several research efforts have produced hepatic assist devices utilizing living hepatocytes.

Tissue Engineering (TE) is a scientific field mainly focused on the development of tissue and organ substitutes by controlling biological, biophysical and/or biomechanical parameters in the laboratory. The result corresponds, in most cases, to the elaboration of three-dimensional cellular constructs with properties more similar to natural tissues than classical monolayer cultures. These systems enable the in vitro study of human physiology and physiopathology more accurately, while providing a set of biomedical tools with potential applicability in toxicology, medical devices, tissue replacement, repair and regeneration. To succeed in these purposes, TE uses nature as an inspiration source for the generation of extracellular matrix analogues (scaffolds), either from natural or synthetic origin as well as bioreactors and bio-devices to mimic natural physiological conditions of particular tissues. These scaffolds embed cells in a threedimensional milieu that display signals critical for the determination of cellular fate, in terms of proliferation, differentiation and migration, among others. The aim of this review is to analyze the state of the art of TE and some of its application fields: bone, cartilage, heart, pancreas, vascular and cancer.

 

  • Track 9-1Tissue engineering for regeneration of damaged tissues
  • Track 9-2Cartilage tissue engineering
  • Track 9-3Cardiac tissue engineering
  • Track 9-4Pancreas tissue engineering
  • Track 9-5Vascular tissue engineering
  • Track 9-6TE for Modeling Human Physiology
  • Track 9-7Drug discovery

\r\n Regenerative medicine seeks to replace tissue or organs that have been damaged by disease, trauma, or congenital issues, vs. the current clinical strategy that focuses primarily on treating the symptoms. The tools used to realize these outcomes are tissue engineering, cellular therapies, and medical devices and artificial organs.

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\r\n When injured or invaded by disease, our bodies have the innate response to heal and defend. What if it was possible to harness the power of the body to heal and then accelerate it in a clinically relevant way? What if we could help the body heal better?

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\r\n The promising field of Regenerative Medicine is working to restore structure and function of damaged tissues and organs. It is also working to create solutions for organs that become permanently damaged. The goal of this medicine is to find a way to cure previously untreatable injuries and diseases.

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\r\n Scientific research is working to make treatments available for clinical use. Treatments include both in vivo and in vitro procedures. In vivo meaning studies and trials performed inside the living body in order to stimulate previously irreparable organs to heal themselves.  In vito treatments are applied to the body through implantation of a therapy studied inside the laboratory.

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  • Track 10-1Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials
  • Track 10-2Cellular Therapies
  • Track 10-3Medical Devices and Artificial Organs
  • Track 10-4Clinical Translation

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\r\n Regenerative medicine (RM), from tissue engineering (TE) to cell therapy, offers valuable treatment options, which are rarely considered in daily clinical settings. Doctors, surgeons, clinicians and, in general, healthcare policies are not prone to substitute conventional approaches with innovative therapies without extended and thorough experiments. A major concern that limits the spreading of RM is related to different challenges to solve definitively, e.g. live tissue handling and manufacturing.

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  • Track 11-1Adult Stem Cells
  • Track 11-2Tissue Preservation and Bio Banking
  • Track 11-3Stem Cell Technologies
  • Track 11-4Embryonic Stem Cells
  • Track 11-5Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
  • Track 11-6Stem Cell Biotechnology
  • Track 11-7Stem Cell Transplantation
  • Track 11-8Bio Materials and Tissue Engineering
  • Track 11-9Stem Cell Biology
  • Track 11-10Stem Cell Therapy
  • Track 11-11Cancer Stem Cells
  • Track 11-12Senescence Cells

\r\n Appropriately preserved stem cells can be later used in the field of regenerative medicine for treating congenital disorders, heart defects etc. Cryopreservation of ovarian tissue would have many benefits for infertility treatment. A direct application of such a technique would be in overcoming infertility in cancer patients rendered infertile by harmful treatments such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy which indiscriminately destroy diseased as well as healthy cells. The ability to cryopreserve preimplantation embryos from both animal and human sources has helped to overcome some of the practical concerns.

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  • Track 12-1Primary cell culture
  • Track 12-2Preservation and storage
  • Track 12-3Pro embryonic stem cell research
  • Track 12-4Cryopreservation
  • Track 12-5Towards cell culture automatization

\r\n Biomaterials , an engineered material used to make gadgets to supplant some portion of a living framework or to work in suggest contact with living tissue. The study of biomedical materials includes an investigation of the piece and properties of materials and the manner by which they associate with nature in which they are set. The most widely recognized classes of materials utilized as biomedical materials are polymers, metals, and earthenware production. These three classes are utilized separately and in blend to frame the greater part of the implantation gadgets accessible today.

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  • Track 13-1Bio active glasses
  • Track 13-2Porous scaffolds
  • Track 13-3Surface ligands and molecular architecture
  • Track 13-4Fabrication of scaffolds
  • Track 13-5Scaffold designs
  • Track 13-6Biomaterials design and technology
  • Track 13-7Biodegradable hydrogel
  • Track 13-8Biomaterials for drug delivery
  • Track 13-9Polymers
  • Track 13-10Metal based material
  • Track 13-11Tissue Microarray

 

 

<p justify;\"="" style="text-align: justify;">Stem cells are defined as being clonogenic, having self-renewal capacity throughout lifetime and giving rise to terminally differentiated cells of various cell lineages. Their differentiation pathway is unidirectional, passing through the stage of lineage and finally generating differentiated cells. Adult stem cell differentiation is traditionally believed to be restricted to the tissue in which the stem cells reside (hematopoietic stem cells generate blood cells,liver progenitor cells produce hepatocytes and). Hematopoietic stem cells are the most thoroughly characterized adult progenitor cells, mostly because of their easy accessibility and use for transplantation to treat malignant disease.

 

  • Track 14-1Neural stem cell
  • Track 14-2Progenitor stem cell
  • Track 14-3Adult stem cell
  • Track 14-4Mesenchymal stem cell
  • Track 14-5Stem Cell
  • Track 14-6Induced pluripotent stem cell
  • Track 14-7Haematopoietic stem cell
  • Track 14-8Embryonic stem cell

\r\n Regeneration and rehabilitation are the values   as of rehabilitation and regenerative medicine, with the ultimate goal of developing innovative and operative methods that promote the restoration of function through tissue regeneration and repair. In order to provide an optimal microenvironment for healing tissues, physical therapists use directed therapy to maximize productivity of the body's innate healing processes. Rehabilitation coupled with regenerative medicine surgeries has shown improved outcomes for tissue regeneration. With innovative findings from medical researchers in tissue engineering and cellular therapies, physical therapists play an important role in translating these findings.

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  • Track 15-1Physical Therapy
  • Track 15-2cardiac rehabilitation practice
  • Track 15-3Clinical grade biotherapies